Paying Students For Good Grades Essays

Did your parents decide to add a little extra incentive to your school work by bringing money into the fold?
More and more, I hear of parents (sometimes even relatives other than parents) that are willing to financially “reward” students for positive results in the classroom. Is this a smart move, or could it be sending the wrong message, both financially and academically?

Many parents who are willing to pay their children for good grades will argue that it is a child’s job to go to school and learn. Therefore, they should be compensated for positive results just as they are at their jobs. If you ask me, this would be the weakest argument for those on the “pro” side of this practice. Logically speaking, it does make sense, but one could counter that not all jobs are rewarded with money. Parents do not clean the house for money. People at unpaid internships get nothing but experience and networking opportunities. Some “jobs” serve not as money-making opportunities, but as character and experience builders. For example, personal growth is one of the main benefits of learning in a classroom with fellow students, which should be payment enough for children.

Another “pro” argument is that the promise of money for grades increases the students’ drive for success and good marks soon follow. Salespeople often get bonuses for high sales numbers, so why not apply this same philosophy to your student in hopes that the potential for income increases effort? One argument against this line of thinking is that kids do not understand the importance of earning money and often don’t really need their own money. If the money does not matter to them, the grades won’t matter. Thus, the promise of getting paid as a reward for good grades is not really a reward. The same argument can be applied to a child that you pay to do tasks around the house. If it comes to a choice of earning $5 to mow the lawn or continuing to play Halo, the kid may not care about the money; he would rather continue his game. To be effective, you must first teach your children how to handle money.

This practice can also get the parents into a bad mindset of thinking money is all that matters to the kid. If a student is struggling, will these parents do everything in their power to have a conversation with teachers or assist with the child’s homework? Would the parents take away driving privileges and time away from friends? Or would they simply threaten to stop paying the kid money? Is the threat of lost money truly enough to entice the student to buckle down and do what is necessary to turn things around in school?

Interestingly, schools themselves have started to pay students for earning good grades. Here’s a story from a N.Y. Times article that tests this out:

New York City students could earn as much as $500 a year for doing well on standardized tests and showing up for class in a new program to begin this fall, city officials announced yesterday. And the Harvard economist who created the program is joining the inner circle of Schools Chancellor Joel I. Klein, according to an official briefed on the hiring.

After the proposed payment plan for students, over 200 schools experimented with it in New York City. With apparently moderate success, other cities have adopted some of the same ideas. And don’t think these plans only apply to the students. Standardized tests can also teachers and school officials monetary rewards. Perhaps in the future, it will not even be up to the parents whether or not to pay students.

The debate over rewarding kids with money for good grades is an argument that could go back and forth for years with no “right” answer on either side. My personal feelings are that paying your children for good grades could potentially work if it’s in combination with other incentives and education by the parents. The child needs to know why he is being paid for good grades and why a good education is so important. To make the financial incentive worthwhile, you also need to teach your children the important of savings and how to manage their money. Whether you believe it’s counterproductive to pay students or it’s a great way to get them to study hard, paying kids for good grades is a hot-button issue that has valid issues both for and against.

Where do you weigh in on the issue?

(photo credit: The Ritters)


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Categories: College & Education, Kids

Hello ^^
I have an argumentative essay titled 'Should students be paid for getting good grades". Please give some advice in any areas or point out my errors. I am open to all comments since this is my first time doing an argumentative essay. This essay is due soon so I really need help.

English Argumentative Essay - Should kids be paid for good grades?
In childhood, children get a candy for a job well done. In school, students get a treat for a job well done. In society, adults get paid with money for a job well done. However, it seems that students are getting paid for getting good grades lately. Cash incentives are used to motivate students to study harder and achieve better grades. The question now is should students get rewarded with cash for good grades?

Yes, I agree that students can get motivated to study if they are paid for good grades. Providing a monetary reward enables the students to focus and study in class. However, I strongly feel that they should not be paid for their good grades.

One school in Chicago implemented this policy to reward students based on their grades. However, after one year, the school was forced to discontinue this policy due to the lack of funds. Though this policy is effective, it is short- lived; the cost of this policy is not possible for schools to uphold. Some may argue that reducing the amount of cash rewards the students receive would solve the problem. This would also result in the decrease in effectiveness of this policy. As students do not find the cash reward appealing, they would not be motivated to study, which diminishes the purpose of the policy. Thus, this policy would not be sustained for long.

Based on a study made by Massachusetts Institute of Technology, money is not a very effective motivator. If a task is simple, straight forward and involves only mechanical skills; then a higher pay would result in a better performance. However, if the task is complicated that requires conceptual, creative thinking and involves rudimentary cognitive skills; it would not be successful at all. Instead, it would be the complete opposite! Many studies have also proved that recognizing student's accomplishments is the ultimately the best motivator. According to Sylvia Rimm, a child psychologist, consistency plays a much more major role in achievement than money does. For example, top students would also try to maintain their results with consistent effort. Whereas, others who failed give up easily as they find that there is no hope in them getting rewards and compliments. Therefore, money is not a good motivator.

Studying is students' responsibility. Students should study because they want to, not forced to. It is also wrong to lure students into studying by using cash as it gives them an idea that everything revolves around money which is a bitter truth that they are too young to learn. This monetary policy encourages the wrong things. Students may get so caught up in focusing on making more money that they assumed getting good grades is purely for the money and not for learning. Hence, this policy would lose the real purpose of learning in life and also diminishes the purpose of school. Students would lose their interest in learning once the rewards are gone. Moreover, students would not take learning seriously and see not point in learning. Studying benefits one and the good grades one attains would come in handy to land a job and decide one's future. Being paid to study teaches the wrong values to students. They would not be determined to strive harder to get the grades for themselves and not for the money. They would have no sense of satisfaction because all they want is more money. They would lose sight of what really matters.

A science research done by the Royal Society of Art shows that there are three factors that would lead to better personal performance and personal satisfaction. The first factor is autonomy, the desire to be self-directed, to use our judgment and creativity to direct our lives. Second factor is mastery, the urge to excel. People practice and spend time doing things because it is fun and satisfying. Last factor is purpose - a transcendent purpose that goes beyond profit. Students should be motivated by these three factors to achieve better grades.

In conclusion, students should not be paid for getting good grades. In the process, they are being taught the wrong character attributes and confused themselves with what matters and does not matters. Moreover, the policy cannot be sustained due to the lack of funds and studies have also proven that money is a bad motivator.

Thanks for taking you time to read and/or comment!
Bye!

I agree with the idea that students can be motivated to study if they are paid for good grades.

As students do not find the cash reward appealing, they would not be motivated to study, which diminishes the purpose of the policy. Thus, this policy would not be sustained for long.


I wonder, specifically, if you could add any more details about the chicago experiment, when they tried giving money for good grades. I wonder how a student qualified for good grades, was it actually cash, or a gift card? I wonder if they were paid quarterly, or at the end of the year, and if the reward was based in improvement, or only high grades.

If a task is simple, straight forward and involves only mechanical skills; then a higher pay would result in a better performance. However, if the task is complicated that requires conceptual, creative thinking and involves rudimentary cognitive skills; it would not be successful at all.

Excellent point, nice job explaining this contrast.

Whereas, others who failed give up easily as they find that there is no hope in them getting rewards and compliments.
I would re-word and strengthen this sentence, as it is a key point that you are making.

chalumeau  

Mar 17, 2012   #3

**try to write the introductory paragraph again. Try to make it about 4 to 5 sentences.

One school in Chicago implemented a policy to reward students based on 1) their grades. However, after one year, the school was forced to discontinue this policy due to the lack of funds. 2) Though this policy 3)is effective, it is short-lived; the cost of this policy is not possible for schools to uphold. Some 4)may argue that reducing the amount of cash rewards the students receive would 5) solve the problem. 6) This would also result in the decrease in effectiveness of this policy. 7) As students do not find the cash reward appealing, they would not be motivated to study, which diminishes the purpose of the policy. 8) Thus, this policy would not be sustained for long.

1)Too vague. Be more specific. e.g. for A's and B's. Where's the citation?
2) I prefer "although" to "though" at the beginning of a sentence.
3) Tense switches here. Maintain tense or transition appropriately. Citation?
4) The use of "may" is weak here. Remove. Think about creating another paragraph here.
5) Would it "solve the problem" or "lengthen the program's duration?"
6) You are trying to make a "however" point, but you are unclear.
7) Conditional sentence without the conditional tense. "If students do not find the cash reward appealing, they would be less motivated to study."
8) Conclude with a summation that the program is impossible to sustain in a large urban school district.

Based on a study 9)made by Massachusetts Institute of Technology, money is 10) not a very effective motivator. If a task is simple, straightforward and involves only mechanical skills 11); then a higher pay would result in a better performance. 12) However, if the task is complicated that requires conceptual, creative thinking and involves rudimentary cognitive skills; it would not be successful at all. Instead, it would be the complete opposite! Many studies have also proved that recognizing 13) student's accomplishments is 14) the ultimately the best motivator. According to Sylvia Rimm, a child psychologist, consistency plays a 15) much more major role in achievement than money does. 16) For example, top students would also try to maintain their results with consistent effort. Whereas, others who failed give up easily as they find that there is no hope in them getting rewards and compliments. Therefore, money is not a good motivator.

9) "Made by" to "by researchers at the"
10) "an ineffective motivator."
11) Change the ";" to ","
12) "On the other hand, if the task requires creative thinking and other higher cognitive skills, then performance is not correlated with pay."
13) students'
14) Remove "the"
15) Change "much more major" to "more important." Citation?
16) Change to "She found that students previously rated as 'high-performers' showed consistent effort to maintain their status, whereas students rated as 'low-performers' showed less effort to maintain theirs."

17)"It is also wrong..." Try to avoid this construction in an argumentative essay. Labeling something as "wrong" does not make it wrong.

18) Avoid run-on sentences. "...to lure students into studying by using cash as it gives them an idea that everything revolves around money which is a bitter truth that they are too young to learn." Break up this sentence.

19) "Students may focus too intently on outcomes and assume that good grades equal earnings, not learning." Suggestion

20) I enjoyed reading about the three factors. They make sense.

Overall, I feel that you have good evidence and research, but your analysis is a little weak. Try to ask yourself questions about the studies you read. Can you think up a scenario and apply something you learned to solve it? Also, try to stay in the present tense as much as humanly possible. Very good start.

this introductory is contradictory as be sure they should be paid for good grade or should not be paid.

Yes, I agree that students can get motivated to study if they are paid for good grades. Providing a monetary reward enables the students to focus and study in class. However, I strongly feel that they should not be paid for their good grades.

i did no go further checking, please be sure in what direction are writing read twice and thrice your writing try to find mistakes yourself at first. Type a essay daily in computer and edit yourself.

I liked the essay and the way you expressed it. Nice points you have covered



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