History International Relations Coursework Assignment

Social and Cultural Patterns of Ancient India

This is an introductory survey course on Ancient Indian history. Working within a broad chronological framework spanning several thousand years, in the lectures, the student will be acquainted with the social formations of the early subcontinental history. Beginning with the Harappan civilization, which was one of the four oldest civilizations of the world, the lectures will trace the development of Indian history through the Vedic Age, formation of city-states and monarchies, emergence and decline of the various ancient Empires, the intercivilizational exchange between the Indian subcontinent and the surrounding areas through trade, travel, conquest or cultural exchange. The weekly discussions of this course will be woven around themes such as ancient literary traditions; the significance of inscriptions, archaeology and numismatics; the world of early historical city; orient-gazing in travellers’ accounts; depiction of femininity in religious art; life in royal courts; the myths of creation in South Asian religions; and the rise and impact of Buddhism on the subcontinent, to name a few.

Note: The teaching format for this course is two lectures and one class discussion each week; for the discussion the class is divided into smaller groups. The course instructor is responsible for the lectures and the TA for discussion sections. The readings consist of a combination of a textbook and of primary sources (of about 100 pages a week).  The course will have a midterm and a final examination, and written work of about 10-15 pages over the course of the term, in any combination of specific assignments.

 

The Indian Middle Ages

This is an introductory survey course on Medieval Indian history. The medieval Indian history is primarily seen as history of Delhi Sultanate and the Mughal Empire. However, this course discards the state-centric lens and examines cultural life, society, economy and arts of the Indian subcontinent from 7th century AD to the 18th century AD. The student will study about the way people dressed, the kinds of food they ate, the popular musical forms and the social norms that governed society and market. The course will help them understand how Islam integrated into the fabric of the subcontinental society, the role Sufi saints played in society and politics of empire and the impact of Bhakti saints on poetry, arts and the Indian caste system. The aim of the course is to dispel certain myths and stereotypes about the middle ages, especially in the Indian context. It will enable the student to question the picture of South Asia as a land ensconced in mysticism and religion; a society with a timeless and changeless civilization; a region fraught by communal and caste rigidities; and a society that was nudged out of its slumber with the advent of the ‘West’.

Note: The teaching format for this course is two lectures and one class discussion each week; for the discussion the class is divided into smaller groups. The course instructor is responsible for the lectures and the TA for discussion sections. The readings consist of a combination of a textbook and of primary sources (of about 100 pages a week).  The course will have a midterm and a final examination, and written work of about 10-15 pages over the course of the term, in any combination of specific assignments.

 

The Making of Modern India

This is an introductory survey course on colonial South Asian history (1700-1947) intended for students with no prior knowledge of the subject. It begins with the demise of the Mughal Empire and the colonization of the Subcontinent by the European trading companies and the establishment of British supremacy. It goes on to examine the British colonial policies and ideologies, Indian reactions to colonial rule, coming into being of colonial cities, role of historical figures such as Gandhi and Jinnah, the region’s liberation from colonial rule and finally the partition of the Subcontinent into India and Pakistan. The weekly discussions of this course will be woven around themes and questions such as was there potential for capitalist development in India, was conquest of India by design or default, were colonial cities a microcosm of the empire, was British rule through military coercion or cultural hegemony, did colonial rule change the lives of Indian women for better, and was Indian nationalism a spurious historical force. Government records, travelers’ accounts, national textbooks, contemporary literary works, maps, paintings, music, speeches of political leaders, and Bollywood cinema will be used as course materials to help students envision the colonial history of the region.

Note: The teaching format for this course is two lectures and one class discussion each week; for the discussion the class is divided into smaller groups. The course instructor is responsible for the lectures and the TA for discussion sections. The readings consist of a combination of a textbook and of primary sources (of about 100 pages a week).  The course will have a midterm and a final examination, and written work of about 10-15 pages over the course of the term, in any combination of specific assignments.

 

From Aesthetics to War: History of the Modern West

This is an introductory survey course in European history from Renaissance to the Second World War. The aim of the course is to familiarize the students with political, social and cultural developments in Europe from the 14th century AD to the 1950s. The course will begin with history of birth, rise and growth of Italian Renaissance and will take the students through the history of the Reformation, the long seventeenth century, the Glorious Revolution. Rise of print culture in Europe, the age of Enlightenment, the French revolution, Restoration of Absolutism, the Italian Resorgimento, German unification and the two history World Wars. The course material will be a mix of historiographical material and primary sources such as paintings, drawings, music, posters, lithographs, speeches, contemporary writings, travellers’ accounts, philosophical texts, and newspaper reports.

Note: The teaching format for this course is two lectures and one class discussion each week; for the discussion the class is divided into smaller groups. The course instructor is responsible for the lectures and the TA for discussion sections. The readings consist of a combination of a textbook and of primary sources (of about 100 pages a week).  The course will have a midterm and a final examination, and written work of about 10-15 pages over the course of the term, in any combination of specific assignments.

 

Reading Texts: The History of French Revolution

This is a compulsory Reading Seminar focused on historiographical readings on a particular historical event, in this case the history of the French Revolution. The students are expected to read selected texts, critically analyze, discuss and review them. In this course the students will be assigned scholarly texts on the French Revolution which examine its history from different perspectives – George Rude’s The Great Fear, George Lefebvre’s The Coming of French Revolution, Albert Soboul’s The Sans-Culottes, Alfred Cobban’ Social Interpretation of French Revolution, Francois Furet’s Interpreting the French Revolution and Simon Schama’s A Chronicle of the French Revolution. This reading-intensive class will function as a semester-long conversation, between the students, the books they read and their fellow students. Contributing to discussion, pushing and responding to one’s peers’ ideas, and helping the peers to polish their writing constitute major elements of the students’ responsibilities in this class.

Note: The reading of one book (along with supplementary readings such as reviews of the book or critical historiographical pieces related to the theme of the book) is divided over a two weeks with weekly discussions and blogging. The students should write at least 4000 words for this course – divided into 4 book reviews of 1000 words or 2 essays of 2000 words or 1 term paper of 4000 words. Each instructor will design their own Reading course. Ideally more than one Reading Course will be offered in a semester to give students an option of choosing one.

 

Reading Sources – Colonialism and Culture in British India

This is a compulsory Reading Seminar designed around a historical theme, event, process or personality but the reading comprises solely of primary sources, in this case Colonialism and Culture in British India. The aim is to train the students to interpret and analyze primary sources. The students are exposed the students to as many different kinds of sources as possible (visual, musical, written, epigraphic, numismatic, artefacts, statistical and oral). The weekly discussions focus on conceptual and methodological issues related to the use of particular kinds of sources. This reading-intensive class will function as a semester-long conversation, between the students, the books they read and their fellow students. Contributing to discussion, pushing and responding to one’s peers’ ideas, and helping the peers to polish their writing constitute major elements of the students’ responsibilities in this class.

Note: This is a seminar format course: Discussions are to be followed by weekly blogs of 500 words. The instructor can design his or her assignments with at least 10-15 pages of writing. Each instructor will design their own Reading course. Ideally more than one Reading Course will be offered in a semester to give students an option of choosing one.

 

Enlightenment & Empire (18th Century)

This course focuses on the writings of thinkers and philosophers of Scottish Enlightenment – Rousseau, Kant, Adam Smith, Bentham , Hegel and John Stuart Mill. Their writings were fundamental to the making of the modern political world. This course will primarily focus on the discussion and debate on the relationship between liberty and commerce and the way enlightenment thought got harnessed in service of colonialism. This is not simply a course on political thought because the student will be reading major texts within their political and intellectual. It will enable the student to understand how a particular thought or philosophy is a product of its historical context. The interconnected of the texts studied will give the students a sense of a deep foundation in understanding the rise and growth of modern politics.

Note: The primary form of instruction can either be lecturing or an in-depth discussion seminar. The expectation is that more time is devoted to discussion of primary and secondary readings. In these courses the coverage and analysis of historical material, and the discussion of historical methods and practices, are more in depth than in the previous courses.  Readings should be about 150-200 pages per week. Written assignments may be more sophisticated and extensive (often in the 20-25 pages or 4,000 words range, as a total of all writing assignments), and some of these classes may not require examinations.

 

History of Silk Road: Premodern Patterns of Globalization (200BC-1453AD)

The Silk Road is one of the earliest examples of premodern global connectivity. Extending from China to Roma, the Silk road created a cultural matrix of interconnectivity. It helped the travellers, trades, religious men, craftsmen and raiders who traversed the Silk Road, imagine a world bigger than their immediate spatial reality. This course will bring to fore the trade, religious, artistic and political connections between Han and Mongol China, Russia, Turkish tribes, Persian elite, Arabs and Roman oligarchies through the writings of primary documents, travelogues, film, art and music. The students will also be engaging in cartographic drawing in this course to map out the Silk Road.

Note: The primary form of instruction can either be lecturing or an in-depth discussion seminar. The expectation is that more time is devoted to discussion of primary and secondary readings. In these courses the coverage and analysis of historical material, and the discussion of historical methods and practices, are more in depth than in the previous courses.  Readings should be about 150-200 pages per week. Written assignments may be more sophisticated and extensive (often in the 20-25 pages or 4,000 words range, as a total of all writing assignments), and some of these classes may not require examinations.

 

A Global History of Cricket

This is a course on the political history of British Empire as seen through the lens of cricket. The course examines how racial, class and caste histories were intertwined with the game of cricket. The course begins with conceptual readings on leisure history of British Empire and introduces the students to key texts on history of cricket written by CLR James which examines the racial roots of the game and the work of Ramchandra Guha which explores its caste dimensions. The course also takes a comparative approach where cricket is compared to other colonial sports such as polo and hunting. The course material will also draw on visuals from the Punch and the Illustrated London News and the commentaries and writings of contemporary authors.

Note: The primary form of instruction can either be lecturing or an in-depth discussion seminar. The expectation is that more time is devoted to discussion of primary and secondary readings. In these courses the coverage and analysis of historical material, and the discussion of historical methods and practices, are more in depth than in the previous courses.  Readings should be about 150-200 pages per week. Written assignments may be more sophisticated and extensive (often in the 20-25 pages or 4,000 words range, as a total of all writing assignments), and some of these classes may not require examinations.

 

International Economics

In this course, students will learn about the theories that explain the nature of international trade, factors that decide the trade policy of nations and the consequences of such policies. The course will also cover certain topics in international macroeconomics like the concept of exchange rates, purchasing power parity, and the determination of exchange rates.

Sociology of Post-Industrial Societies

How do we observe, analyze, apprehend society when it is spatially dispersed and virtual, residing in networks and new forms of affinity? To what extent does technology shape society, or is it rather than technology is driven by social needs which shape and reshape it? Demonstrating how and why contemporary social theory has converged on common questions, across the disciplines (including philosophy, sociology, anthropology, economics, geography, ecology, history), the course will explore topics such as:- the city and urbanity, globalization, science and technology, environmentalism and the case for analysis of the world as a ‘system’ in which different parts are positioned in relation to a dominant ‘core’.

 

Introduction to Political Thought

The course will introduce fundamental concepts of political philosophy through a critical reading of some of the major texts and thinkers from both the western and Indian political traditions. The central question of the course will be to trace how various political thinkers have impacted the development of different political institutions, from the polis to government and democracy.

 

Global Politics

The focus of this course will be to understand how globalisation affects public and social actions and how state and non-state actors, individual and collective actors, cooperate and oppose each other on the world’s stage, reshaping classic inter-state relations. This course will be completely pluridisciplinary and will be based on case studies of some of the major challenges brought by globalisation – financialisation and economic globalisation, new interdependences, migration and conflicts, among others. It will also focus on the attempts at reorganising the world order after the fall of the Berlin Wall and will use cartography as tool for enlightening complex processes of global change.

 

Comparative Politics

A comparative study of political systems, this course will provide students with a foundational framework to examine political events through theoretical analysis, for instance, explaining the relationship between democracy and economic development, or the functioning of authoritarian regimes. This course will aim at developing tools for political comparison; to critically engage with concepts and events like democratic transition, democratisation, de-democratisation, political conflict, civil wars etc.

 

Dynamics of State formation

This course will examine the trajectory of State-building in India through an examination of the pre-Independence roots of the modern Indian state and its re-invention by the Constituent Assembly. It will also focus on the progressive reshaping of the Indian state – linguistic federalism, affirmative action, decentralisation, among other themes –, contextualised in their social and economic context. The terms and actors of the debates and controversies that have accompanied these changes will also be examined.

Programme Structure

Combined degree structure as for RV11/RV21/RV41

This is the most popular of the combined history degrees, and includes core skills modules and a range of options in politics, alongside complementary modern history modules exploring state structures and political ideologies in British, European, American and Asian contexts.

• In your final year, choose to write a dissertation on a subject of your choice in either Modern History or Politics.

• Add breadth to your degree and pursue varied interests by taking the option to complete 25 per cent of your programme in another subject.

For further details see the full course map under Modules.

View the programme specification document for this course

Key Facts

  • We possess many collections of original historical documents, including the
    Wellington, Palmerston and Mountbatten papers and the Parkes Archives.
  • We offer the chance for all students to study at universities abroad, including France, Holland, Poland and Canada.
  • Courses in many fields rarely taught in most other UK universities, such as East and Central European history, South East Asian history and Jewish history.
  • We teach courses in many fields rarely taught in most other UK universities, such as East and Central European history, South East Asian history and Jewish history

Typical entry requirements

A Levels:
QualificationGrade
GCE A-level

AAB to ABB including History or a related subject*.

Applicants taking the Extended Project Qualification (EPQ) will also be made an alternative offer one grade below the standard offer, conditional on an A grade in the EPQ.

We accept all A levels except General Studies.

IB:
QualificationGrade
International Baccalaureate34 points, 17 at higher level, including 6 in higher level history or related subject*.

 

*Related subject includes subjects such as English, Philosophy, Religious Studies or Classical Civilisation or other humanities based essay writing subjects. Students applying without History will need to make a case in their personal statement.

 

International applications

We welcome applications from international students. Helpful information on applying, meeting a University representative in your country, or improving your English language levels can be found on the International Office website. If English is not your first language you will be required to pass an approved English test. We normally ask for an overall IELTS score of 6.5 with no less than 6.5 in Writing and Reading and no less than 6.0 in Speaking and Listening or an equivalent standard in other qualifications approved by the University.

Alternative qualifications

We welcome applications from candidates offering qualifications other than A and AS levels (including BTEC, European Baccalaureate, International Baccalaureate, Irish Leaving Certificate and Scottish Highers). You will be expected to attain an equivalent standard in other qualifications approved by the University to an A level applicant. Contact us for further information on equivalencies for these qualifications and others not listed here.

Contextual Offers

 

The University of Southampton is committed to widening participation and ensuring that all students with the potential to succeed, regardless of their background, are encouraged to apply to study with us. The additional information gained through contextual data supports our admissions teams to recognise a student’s potential to succeed in the context of their background and experience. Students who flagged in this way will be made an offer which is lower than the typical offer for that programme.

A typical contextual offer is ABB from three A levels including History (or a related subject*) or an equivalent standard in other qualifications approved by the University.

Please see our contextual admission pages for more information

 

Selection process:
Intake:
150
Average applications per place:
8

Selection is normally based on actual or predicted grades plus the reference and personal statement on your UCAS application. Exceptionally we may ask you to come for an interview before making an offer.

This page contains specific entry requirements for this course. Find out about equivalent entry requirements and qualifications for your country.

Typical course content

The history undergraduate programme is modular. This means that your programme is divided into self-contained modules taught and assessed in a single semester. Taught modules may be single (two hours teaching a week), or double (three to four hours teaching a week, depending on the type of module).

Year 2

The following is an indicative list of available optional modules, which are subject to change each academic year. Please note in some instances modules have limited spaces available.

You must take one History option course in each semester. Neither of these may be a pre-1750 course.

Compulsory Politics modules:
PAIR2010 Democracy and the State 
PAIR2004 Research Skills (compulsory for those writing a Politics Dissertation)

Year 3

The following is an indicative list of available optional modules, which are subject to change each academic year. Please note in some instances modules have limited spaces available.

You will take two optional Politics modules in each semester, plus a History Special Subject module which spans both semesters, chosen from the options below.

Please note: This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if s/he takes full advantage of the learning opportunities that are provided. More detailed information can be found in the programme handbook (or other appropriate guide or website).

Tuition fees

NameYear of entryMode of studyUK/EUInternational
BA Modern History and Politics2018Part-time£4,625£8,268
BA Modern History and Politics2018Full-time£9,250£16,536
View the full list of course fees

Funding

Scholarships, bursaries or grants may be available to support you through your course. Funding opportunities available to you are linked to your subject area and/or your country of origin. These can be from the University of Southampton or other sources.

Explore funding opportunities

Costs associated with this course

Students are responsible for meeting the cost of essential textbooks, and of producing such essays, assignments, laboratory reports and dissertations as are required to fulfil the academic requirements for each programme of study.

In addition to this, students registered for this programme typically also have to pay for:

TypeDescriptionCost
Printing and copyingWhere possible, coursework such as essays; projects; dissertations is likely to be submitted on line. However, there are some items where it is not possible to submit on line and students will be asked to provide a printed copy. The University printing costs are currently: A4 - 5p per side (black and white) or 25p per side (colour) A3 - 10p per side (black and white) or 50p per side (colour) Please Note: Paper sizes not recognised by the printing devices will prompt you to select the size and then charge a minimum of 50p per black and white copy and a maximum of £1 per colour copy. You can pay for your printing by using the money loaders or by using print copy payment service by going to https://www.southampton.ac.uk/isolutions/students/printing-for-students.page. The University Print Centre also offers a printing and copying service as well as a dissertation/binding service. £0.05-1.00

There will also be further costs for the following, not purchasable from the University:

TypeDescription
StationeryYou will be expected to provide your own day-to-day stationery items, e.g. pens, pencils, notebooks, etc. Any specialist stationery items will be specified under the Additional Costs tab of the relevant module profile.
BooksWhere a module specifies core texts these should generally be available on the reserve list in the library. However due to demand, students may prefer to buy their own copies. These can be purchased from any source. Some modules suggest reading texts as optional background reading. The library may hold copies of such texts, or alternatively you may wish to purchase your own copies. Although not essential reading, you may benefit from the additional reading materials for the module.
EquipmentLaboratory equipment and materials: All laboratory equipment and materials are provided.
EquipmentIT: Computer discs or USB drives - Students are expected to provide their own portable data storage device.
EquipmentIT: Software licences - All software is provided
EquipmentIT: Hardware - It is advisable that students provide their own laptop or personal computer, although shared facilities are available across the University campus.
PlacementsPlacements (including Study Abroad Programmes): Students on placement programmes can expect to cover costs for health and travel insurance, accommodation and living expenses, travel costs and visa costs. This will vary depending on which country you are travelling to. Specific details on what additional costs there will be are detailed in the individual module profiles which can be found under the modules tab of the programmes details of your programme.

In some cases you'll be able to choose modules (which may have different costs associated with that module) which will change the overall cost of a programme to you. Please also ensure you read the section on additional costs in the University’s Fees, Charges and Expenses Regulations in the University Calendar available at www.calendar.soton.ac.uk.

Career Opportunities

Learning & Assessment

Breakdown of study time and assessment

Proportion of time spent in scheduled learning, teaching and independent study
Learning, teaching and assessment stage123
Scheduled learning & teaching study17%16%13%
Independent study83%84%87%
Placement study0%0%0%
Proportion of assessment by method
Learning, teaching and assessment stage123
Written exam assessment10%25%25%
Practical exam assessment21%8%1%
Coursework assessment69%67%74%

 A Modern History and Politics degree at Southampton combines an education in the discipline of history (historiography), the development of historical debates and ways of imagining the past with the interdisciplinary study of politics and international relations. We are committed to facilitating a personalised and above all enjoyable experience, ensuring you graduate with the critical and communication skills you need to begin a successful career

• Specialise in specific areas of history or expand the breadth of your studies in history modules that span chronologies and geographies, and in modules selected from other programmes

• Teaching by world-leading and passionate History and Politics academics, who share recent discoveries and debates in their subject

• Talks from renowned international scholars in our visiting lecture and seminar series

• Specialist online learning resources for every module

• Challenging and varied range of assessment methods, including presentations, group projects, dissertations, essays and exams

• Receive regular and supportive advice, guidance and feedback on your progress from a dedicated academic advisor

• Visits to museums, galleries and archival collections, including University collections at the Parkes Institute and the Broadlands archive

• Opportunities to spend a semester or a year at one of our international partner universities to experience a new culture and learning environment in Europe, Australia, Asia, and North America

Employability is embedded into modules from the first year onwards, right from the first lecture. We carefully explain the skills taught and offer a number of optional employability modules and career workshops.

Additional opportunities include summer internships with major local employers, including placements funded by the University. With many employers now expecting extracurricular or voluntary experience, this can prove vital.

Vicky Shilling is a graduate of History at Southampton. “I visited Southampton and absolutely loved it,” she said. “I liked the atmosphere on campus and the up-to-date facilities all looked like places I could really work.”

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